China Entry and Exit Customs Regulations

Entry

Tourists must complete two copies of the baggage declaration form. One copy is given to the customs officer and the other is retained to show upon exiting the country.

Personal belongings, including food, two bottles of liquor and two cartons of cigarettes, will be admitted duty free. Wristwatches, radios, tape recorders, cameras, movie cameras, and similar items may be brought in for personal use but cannot be sold or transferred to others and must be taken out of China when the traveler leaves.

Gifts for relatives or friends in China, or articles carried on behalf of others, must be declared.

Visitors can bring in an unlimited amount of foreign currency, traveler's checks, and the unspent portion can be taken out.

The following articles may not be brought into China:
1. Arms, ammunition, and explosives of any kind
2. Radio transmitters-receivers and principal parts
3. Renminbi (Chinese currency) in cash
4. Manuscripts, printed matter, films, photographs, cinematographic films, loaded recording tapes and videotapes which are detrimental to China's politics, economy, culture and ethics
5. Illegal, habit-forming drugs, opium, morphine, heroin, etc.
6. Animals, plants and products infected with or carrying germs and insect pests
7. Unsanitary and germ-carrying foodstuffs from infected areas
8. Other articles which are prohibited by state regulations

Exit
On leaving China, tourists must submit the second copy of the baggage declaration form for customs inspection. Travelers by ship are exempt.

Items purchased in China with RMB converted from foreign currencies may be taken out or mailed out of the country after receipts are presented for customs inspection. In cities where a customs office does not exist, this can be arranged through the local Friendship Store.

The following articles may not be taken out of China:
1. Arms, ammunition, or explosives of any kind
2. Radio transmitters-receivers and principal parts
3. Renminbi (Chinese currency) in cash and negotiable securities in RMB
4. Un-ratified foreign currency, foreign notes or drafts
5. Manuscripts, printed matter, films, photographs, cinematographic films, loaded recording tapes and videotapes, etc. which are detrimental to China's national security
6. Rare and precious copies of books about China’s revolution, history, culture and art that are not for sale
7. Valuable animals, plants, and seeds
8. Precious metals, pearls, and jewels. (Items declared at customs are exempt.)
9. Other articles prohibited to be exported by state regulations